Javin: Reviving my desire for an A.I. Player for X-Wing

Originally posted on Team Covenant

I’ve been interested for a while now in Javin a projector-based visualisation tool for X-Wing, which would have several components ultimately:

1) A projector table to show off visualisation software, such as Vassal or a bespoke coded program.

2) Interactive table features to allow AR tags on ship bases to be recognised on the table as a hybrid computer/physical game interface.

3) Artificial intelligence opponents that could play either a virtual opponent or a physical opponent.

Sadly, the two students I put on this over 2013 were rather poor in delivering results, so the project was sort of shelved for a while. Anyway, I am now looking at Vassal as the main visualisation software, rather than creating our own testbed, because it has become ubiquitous in online play; the exceptional work in appearance and functionality of Vassal is well above anything that I could do in the short term. So, I am now looking at ways to modify/extend Vassal and/or the X-Wing module to allow asteroid and ship positions (x,y,ø) to be transmitted to an outside process for A.I. planning of ship movements. These would then need to be passed back to the settings for the AI. movement dials, ideally, but we need to be realistic. Many rulings and interpretations of pilot abilities and general implementation of movement would still require a human to apply.

Anyway, when (if!) I make any progress on Javin I will, of course, post it here.

 

UPDATE

I’ve been playing with Vassal basic editing, and come up with a ‘canon’ extra fighter, the TIE/d (Note, not the TIE/D which is the Defender. In this case the ‘d’ stands for ‘drone’). If you would like to run these, the important thing to do as ‘human’ players is to simulate a basic A.I. and have craft engaging in swarm (as in bot) behaviour; keeping apart, but pursuing the nearest enemy, regardless of ‘who’ is tactically best to attack. NOTE: This player should be immune to ‘Biggs’ despite the fact that this is not specifically mentioned on the card I created, as it only just occurred to me; this depends upon ‘how’ the Biggs Effect works of course. Also, on considering the weak A.I. of the lookup table (Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3) / Web Applet as a suitable model for the first version of an inbuilt A.I. that system ignores assigning Stress Tokens, because it would occasionally produce illegal moves otherwise; when a Red move came up and the ship was already stressed. There are two solutions to this:

  1. Allow the move, but stack up the stress counters, which would represent increasing confusion on the part of the bot brain and prevent actions until all had been cleared off.
  2. Update/extend the lookup table to account for occasional restrictions on movements, which would complicate the basic A.I. table quite a bit.


Pilot Card

Ship Token (with stats)

I’ll include a download link here once I’ve finished the Vassal extension and tested it.

#fivesentencefiction – Moments “Oh well”

Lillie McFerrin Writes

Lillie McFerrin hosts a Five Sentence Fiction competition on her blog. This week’s theme is Moments.

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Here is my entry, which is inspired by the picture this week:

Source

“Oh well”
by Dr. Mike Reddy (@doctormikereddy)

“No, look,” Bill said smugly. “It’s a reflex action from birth, but it don’t last long, so ya have to help me now!”

“You’re serious, aren’t ya?” his best mate asked. “You want me to video you suspending your sister’s baby over the old wishing well… for a YouTube video…?”

“Totally, Ted! It will be VIRAL!” he said, pointing repeatedly at the camera.

Ted grudgingly started recording, his one visible eye seeking reassurance that it was going to be ok.

“Holly shit,” he said “The little bugger is totally hanging from your fin… Oh!”

#TicckleTuesday #12 theme: Mercury retrograde in Scorpio #flashfic

What happened to last week? Well, there WAS a #11, but it was a FaceBook exclusive 😛

Theme this week is “Mercury retrograde in Scorpio”, suggested by Jess West (@West1Jess), inspired by this.

Go here to post the video or post the text as a comment here or on the Ticckle Tuesday FaceBook group.

Note
Things have been a bit hectic at work, so I haven’t had a chance to record many submissions for #TicckleTuesday. However, responses to a flash fiction podcast have been positive. Watch this space!

Mike

#TicckleTuesday #10 – Superstition #flashfiction

What happened to last week? I’m not sure I know! However, a car crash and a hurried trip to Zagreb, Croatia by the wife left me juggling three children with one hand (speaking metaphorically). so, apologies…

Theme this week is “Superstition”, suggested by Jess West (@West1Jess), possibly inspired by my own run of bad luck…

And the image prompt…

… is in your worst imagination…

Go here to post the video or post the text as a comment here or on the FaceBook group.

Note
Things have been a bit hectic at work, so I haven’t had a chance to record many submissions for #TicckleTuesday. However, I’m taking over editing of a board games podcast soon, and wondered whether that format might be a good one for audio versions of flash fiction. Please comment below and tell me what you think.

Mike

#TicckleTuesday “Mechanical Quirk” #flashfiction

“You’ve heard of the Mechanical Turk, right?”

“The thing that played chess and answered all your questions?”

“Right. I’m the Mechanical Quirk. I solve your problems. I ‘fix’ the ‘Dispossessed’.”

“The dis…”

” Ok… God… Screw up… Universal glitch…. Everything built ’11 inches to the North’… Some can ‘feel’ it… Makes ’em ‘different’. I fix.”

“Different? How?”

“Sadder. Madder. Badder. Usually sadder. Creative though. Driven cos NOTHING fits.”

“What if I don’t want to be fixed?”

#FiveSentenceFiction – Flowers “On the saying of something or other…” #flashfiction

Lillie McFerrin Writes

Lillie McFerrin hosts a Five Sentence Fiction competition on her blog. This week’s theme is Flowers.

Here is my entry, which is inspired by the picture this week:

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Source

“On the saying of something or other with something that is pretty much already dead but still smells nice for a while at least”
by Dr. Mike Reddy (@doctormikereddy)

“I don’t get it,” he said, rocking back and forth and chewing on his knuckle, “Why is it nice to kill something, then give it to someone?”

He rarely did ‘get it’ but this was knuckle-chewingly bad, so I put down my work things and turned to pay him my full attention.

“Someone spends a lot of time and effort, Oh and water and sun, although the Sun is free I guess, and the plants grow, and then they are killed, yes?” he asked in one hasty breath.

“Well, people like the colours and the smell and the fact that someone took the trouble to bring them a gift,” I explained.

“So, people like the fact that these bright smelly things were killed just for them!” he said sadly, but at least the rocking had stopped for now.

#FlashFridayFic “An Interview with the Wizard of Stratford” #fridayflash #flashfiction

The latest Friday Fiction #41 asked for a 350 word story, based upon the following image:

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Image Source

Here is my story, but do check out the original location to read other entries:

“An Interview with the Wizard of Stratford”
by Dr. Mike Reddy (@doctormikereddy)
[350 words]

“I know why you are here…” is the first thing Frank says, pulling back the curtain that reveals his work space, but he declines to be photographed for the article. He is a wizened old man, dressed entirely in green; his favourite colour, he confides.

Baum’s farm is dead centre in dust bowl territory, getting hit by tornadoes and dust storms four or five times a year. For other farmers, trying to harvest wheat or raise cattle, these events are devastating. For Frank, the self-styled “Wizard of Stratford”, and his family they are a Godsend.

“So long as the farmhouse survives,” he jokes, “and it don’t end up in Oklahoma! I don’t, by God, want to live in Oklahoma!”

Frank hails from Kansas, another area renowned for tornadoes. His small holding is the sole supplier of industrial grit in the whole of Texas. Others have tried to imitate his success, but don’t have the almost magical Baum gift of harvesting and selling the frequent weather deposits. To be honest, few (if any) really understands who buys his grit, or how he makes money. Frank keeps his customers in the strictest confidence, for obvious reasons. And several attempts at industrial espionage have all failed. Probably due to the Baum Farm being exclusively tended by people of reduced stature: dwarfs, pigmies, midgets and munchkins are all terms used by the ‘normal’ Stratford population..

“These ‘little’ people are fiercely loyal, and ideally suited to harvesting the dust that settles here.” Jim explains, “They drop in all the time to help us send raw material to the Gale Processing Plant in Kansas, were it is environmentally treated before being shipped to its final destination.” Gale’s ecological motto is “Better Beyond the Rainbow”

This link to his Kansas roots in dust farming stretches back to his Great Aunt Dorothy. “A remarkably well travelled adventurer”, Baum fondly describes her. Business must be extremely profitable, judging by the number of exquisite jewelled artefacts on display in the family home.

“Dorothy was always fonder of rubies,” Jim remarks, “but I don’t, by God. Emeralds are my obsession.”

#TicckleTuesday – Maudlin “All washed up at the Magdalene Laundry” #flashfiction

Given that “maudlin” is derived from Mary Magdalene, and the Magdalene Laundries are topical, I thought I’d base my own #TicckleTuesday story on that. Here are some relevant sources:
How did the Magdalene Laundries get away with it (An account of ‘victims’ and ‘survivors’)
BBC Story on the Compensation Scheme (public apology and announcement of variable compensation of £58million
Nuns confirm they wont contribute to compensation scheme (basically, a “we didn’t do anything wrong” argument.)
Apparent Myths about the Magdalene Laundries (take this one with a pinch of salt, but do read it for an attempt at balance!)

Here is my story:
“All washed up at the Magdalene Laundries”
by Dr. Mike Reddy (@doctormikereddy)

Accounts vary. Reports differ. However, somewhere between ten and thirty thousand ‘fallen’ women lived and worked at the Magdalene Laundries. The Catholic Church dismiss the ‘myths’ of abuse and slavery. The Government does what it always does: take token responsibility for actions taken before most of the politicians were born. Land sales are profitable, but uncover unmarked mass graves. Families (if they exist) care for shattered, institutionalised survivors.

Dr. Mike Reddy